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  • Sebastian Holley

Life Of Balance

Updated: Jun 5, 2019


Having a balanced life is not about juggling life's events.



Welcome to Anointed Clay our effort to share in hopes of getting you to your greater truth.

You shall have honest scales, honest weights, an honest ephah, and an honest hin: I am the LORD your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt. (Leviticus 19:36)


This article is about understanding true balance. We have to make the distinction of what true balance is. Most of our general thoughts concerning balance are either carnal or off. Most current conversations about balance in "Christian" circles are really just attitudes to defend or justify carnal appetites. The argument tends to start with encouraging balance between the natural and the spiritual. For example, it's okay to compromise in areas of sin for the sake of "balance." Balance is not some place of harmony between the law and love or between being spiritual or being carnal. As a believer in right relationship with God, we are always spiritual. We are spiritual beings functioning in our assignment on the earth while in the flesh. There is not a conflict between the law and love; both are beneficial to us when placed in proper order. Love has to lead the relationship. Another common misconception is that balance is juggling life, but it is not. Balance is centering life by properly prioritizing toward truth.

For a scale to be just, there are certain elements that have to be available; a fulcrum, a pivot, and a standard weight or control. These things have to be precise, so we can't just use anything. The fulcrum is the beam that is centered on the pivot and the control is placed on either end to be the standard in which the unknown is weighed against. This simple scale is an illustration of our truth being weighed. The level of self-examination for us to honestly assess everything about ourselves must have true calibration so all the elements represent the Christ. He is the fulcrum, the pivot and the standard. Our functioning from this position is the picture of having the right motive that leads to proper balance.

Motive is an essential component of balance. For there to be a balancing of elements, again there must be a centered pivot point. That pivot of this balance is the pursuit of Christ. Right relationship is the deciding factor of motive. In this, it will be very important to understand the distinction between ministry, church, and works, legalism and the right relationship with the Christ. Although these activities are opportunity to draw nearer to God, they all have the potential to become distractions and substitutes, in a sense justification for our having a personal agenda or selfish ambition. Balance must start with the harmony of self-unity. "Will thou be made whole?" is the question Jesus asked in the gospels, and being whole and having harmony are pretty much synonymous. In understanding this, you must first gather the why; the reason for each aspect of your personage, and the spirit was given as government. This is the part that came forth from and reconnects with God as He is Spirit. Therefore, the Spirit is also your eternal truth.

The mind is neutral, it can be spiritual or natural depending upon which part of you is in power or control and it is also the processor and storage of information. It's the seat of intellect.

The soul or conscience is the seat of emotions, feelings or the seat of appetite the flesh is the part that's needed for activity in the earth and can be governed by the spirit through the mind or by the mind through reasoning and logic; or led by feelings , emotions or desire. Jesus was balanced. He was all man and all God, and His balance came from his humility , His focus, His communion with the Father and His love. He was the greatest example of the harmony between spirit and flesh while being here on earth.

The only way to never go to the extreme is with proper balance. When our spirit man is anchored in truth we can have a proper balance.

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© 2019 By Sebastian Holley  Ministries